7 Best Leaf Rakes of 2021 [Reviews]

Red rake propped on bench beside pile of leaves

A leaf rake is a must-have for homeowners who love their lawn. A thick layer of leaves can kill your grass and invite pests if you ignore it for too long. Comb through our list of the seven best leaf rakes to see which tool catches your eye. 

We gathered several popular leaf rakes on the market and compared their specifications, such as tine material, rake head width, handle material, and cost. Our top picks include four rakes with non-telescopic handles and three rakes with telescopic handles

If you want to adjust your rake’s height for convenient storage or ease of use, then you might prefer a telescopic rake. If you need a sturdy rake, then a non-telescopic rake is best.  

We also have included a buyers guide below detailing the various factors which make up a high-quality lawn rake (Tip #1: Say yes to metal rakes and no to plastic rakes). 

7 Top Leaf Rakes – Reviews

1. Best Leaf Rake (Non-Telescopic): Fiskars 397930-1001 PRO Rake

Fiskars 397930-1001 PRO Rake, Leaf, 65 Inch, Silver

Fiskars ensures its PRO tools are designed to last longer, improve efficiency, and reduce the impact on the body. But the company’s commitment to quality isn’t the only reason we love the Fiskars 397930-1001 PRO Rake. 

Here’s why the Fiskars PRO Rake rakes home the gold: 

  • Metal tabs keep the rake’s steel teeth locked in place, so you won’t have to worry about the rake head snapping under pressure. 
  • The 24-inch steel rake head covers a wide area as you work, helping you get the job done fast. 
  • Its aluminum handle is packed with strength. Metal is the best material for heavy-duty work, outperforming wood and fiberglass handles. 

Bonus points: The Fiskars PRO Rake also prioritizes user comfort. Equipped with a teardrop-shaped shaft that better fits the contours of your hand, the rake helps alleviate the aches and pains associated with the repetitive movements of leaf raking. 

Specifications: 

  • Tine Material: Steel
  • Handle Material: Aluminum
  • Number of Tines: 24
  • Rake Head Width: 24 inches

Pros: 

✓ Steel tines are stronger and more durable than plastic tines
✓ The metal handle is more durable than wood and fiberglass handles
✓ 24-inch rake head enables fast performance
✓ Metal tabs keep the rake’s steel tines locked in place
✓ Teardrop-shaped shaft designed to fit the contours of your hand

Cons: 

✗ Aluminum handles are not as durable as steel handles
✗ Expensive

2. Runner-Up (Non-Telescopic): ERGIESHOVEL ERG-LFRK24

ERGIESHOVEL ERG-LFRK24 Strain Reducing 54-Inch Shaft, 24 Steel Teeth Leaf Rake, Gray/Orange

The ERGIESHOVEL ERG-LFRK24 isn’t your traditional leaf rake. The tool has a D-grip handle extending from the shaft’s middle in addition to its end handle grip. 

Here’s why that’s awesome: The innovative D-grip handle enhances leverage and reduces strain. The less back pain you feel, the more leaves you can rake. That sounds like the perfect combo for productivity. 

The leaf rake also boasts steel teeth and a steel handle, making it a leaf raking champion and one of the best leaf rakes on the market. Steel is stronger and more durable than aluminum, making it the best material for heavy-duty work. A steel tool will last for years, and it has the strength to form the biggest of leaf piles. 

So why didn’t the ERGIESHOVEL ERG-LFRK24 Leaf Rake make our top-pick? Here’s why: The all-steel tool has the second smallest rake head width on our list. Although its 22.8-inch width is suitable for a rake, we compared many rake heads with larger widths, putting the ERGIESHOVEL ERG-LFRK24 slightly behind our rankings. 

Specifications: 

  • Tine Material: Steel
  • Handle Material: Steel
  • Number of Tines: 24
  • Rake Head Width: 22.8 inches

Pros: 

✓ Innovative D-grip handle enhances leverage and reduces strain
✓ Steel tines and steel handle 
✓ Has a handle grip

Cons: 

✗ Second smallest rake head width
✗ Expensive
✗ Steel is heavy, which can make the rake uncomfortable for some users
✗ Users must assemble the rake

3. Third Best Leaf Rake (Non-Telescopic): Bully Tools 92312

Bully Tools 92312 Leaf and Thatching Rake with Fiberglass Handle and 24 Spring Steel Tines

Users are raving over the Bully Tools 92312 Leaf Rake for its high-quality construction and strength. Bully Tools claims its made-in-the-USA, commercial-grade leaf rake can handle heavy-duty debris –– including river rocks!

Don’t let narrow rakes slow down your yard work. The leaf rake boasts a whopping 25-inch wide head, the largest width on our list. Its 24 metal tines are ready for a challenge, and the fiberglass handle is a superb alternative to wood. 

Here’s why: Wooden handles are durable, and a popular choice, but they’re susceptible to rot and water damage. A fiberglass handle won’t degrade like wood will, so you won’t need to worry about keeping it away from wet working conditions. Fiberglass is also stronger than wood, resulting in a long tool lifespan. 

Specifications: 

  • Tine Material: Steel
  • Handle Material: Fiberglass
  • Number of Tines: 24
  • Rake Head Width: 25 inches

Pros: 

✓ Steel head
✓ Fiberglass handles are strong and won’t rot like hardwood handles will
✓ Largest rake head width on our list
✓ Bully Tools claims its leaf rake is commercial-grade and can handle heavy-duty cleanups
✓ Has a handle grip
✓ Limited lifetime warranty

Cons: 

✗ Expensive
✗ Some users report the leaf rake is too heavy
✗ Some users experience the tines breaking off 

4. Fourth Best Leaf Rake (Non-Telescopic): Corona RK 62061

Corona RK 62061 Fixed Tine Leaf Rake, Aluminum Handle, 19-Inch Wide

Metal handles can be uncomfortable to touch if left out in the sun or the cold, but with the Corona RK 62061 Leaf Rake, its long anti-slip vinyl grip extends down the shaft so you can work comfortably in extreme conditions. In other words, raking with the Corona RK 62061 shouldn’t feel like you’re holding a Popsicle or hot potato. 

Here’s another reason we like this leaf rake: The Corona RK 62061 Leaf Rake’s head design applies even pressure to all the tines for maximum performance. When a leaf rake head doesn’t have even pressure along its tines, it only slows down your progress. 

Users who need a lightweight tool option will love this rake’s lightweight aluminum shaft. The rake features tempered spring steel tines for greater durability and has a limited lifetime warranty. 

Specifications: 

  • Tine Material: Steel
  • Handle Material: Aluminum
  • Number of Tines: 25
  • Rake Head Width: 19 inches

Pros: 

✓ Tempered spring steel tines
✓ Lightweight aluminum handle
✓ Affordable
✓ Long anti-slip vinyl grip increases user comfort in extreme temperatures
✓ Rake head design applies even pressure to all the tines for maximum performance
✓ Limited lifetime warranty

Cons: 

✗ Aluminum handles are not as durable as steel handles
✗ The 19-inch rake head width is the smallest on our list 
✗ Some users report the tool bends easily

1. Best Telescopic Rake: MLTOOLS Garden Leaf Rake

MLTOOLS Garden Leaf Rake | 64-inch Adjustable Garden Rake | Expandable or Collapsing Shrub Rake | 15 Flat Tine Steel Rake with Extendable Handle – R8236

A telescopic handle lets you adjust the rake’s length so you can better reach certain areas of the yard, such as behind a shed or underneath a bench. A telescopic rake is also easy to store. 

Our favorite telescopic rake is the MLTOOLS Garden Leaf Rake. It ranks No. 1 for its steel tines, steel handle, large rake head width (24 inches), non-slip plastic grip, affordable cost, and adjustable rake head. 

Need to rake tight areas in the garden? The tool’s adjustable rake head ranges from 7½ to 24 inches. Spread the rake head to its full width when raking dry leaves, or shrink it down when you need to rake between delicate plants. Users can also adjust the expandable rake down to 31 inches or up to 64 inches. 

MTOOLS claims its rake can clear up leaves in the lawn, under hedges, and in dense flower beds and loosen up garden soil without disturbing the plants.   

Pro Tip: Since telescopic rakes have adjustable handles, they are hollow and have more weak points than non-telescopic rakes. For heavy-duty work, stick to a non-telescopic rake. 

Specifications: 

  • Tine Material: Steel
  • Handle Material: Steel
  • Number of Tines: 15
  • Rake Head Width: 24 inches

Pros: 

✓ Steel tines
✓ Steel handle
✓ Affordable
✓ Lightweight
✓ Large rake head width
✓ Non-slip plastic grip

Cons: 

✗ Some users report the leaf rake feels flimsy 

2. Runner-Up Telescopic Rake: ORIENTOOLS Steel Leaf Rake

ORIENTOOLS Steel Leaf Rake, Telescopic Leaves Rake with Adjustable 8”- 23” Folding Head and Comfortable Grip Handle (15 Tines,32 to 63 inches)

Shopping on a budget? Consider the ORIENTOOLS Steel Leaf Rake. This telescopic rake is the most affordable tool on our list of best leaf rakes. It’s equipped with steel tines and a steel handle, is lightweight, and has a comfortable grip handle, making it a great help in the lawn or garden. 

How does it compare to the MLTOOLS Garden Leaf Rake? The main difference is smaller dimensions. 

  • The ORIENTOOLS Steel Leaf Rake has an adjustable rake head fanning out from 8 to 23 inches, while the MLTOOLS Garden Leaf Rake’s head fans out from 7½ to 24 inches. 
  • The MLTOOLS Garden Leaf Rake expands from 31 to 64 inches, while the ORIENTOOLS Steel Leaf Rake ranges from 32 to 63 inches. 

Specifications: 

  • Tine Material: Steel
  • Handle Material: Steel
  • Number of Tines: 15
  • Rake Head Width: 23 inches

Pros: 

✓ Steel tines
✓ Steel handles
✓ The most affordable rake on our list (note that prices are subject to change)
✓ Comfortable grip handle
✓ Lightweight

Cons: 

✗ Some users report the leaf rake breaks easily

3. Third Best Telescopic Rake: Buyplus Adjustable Garden Leaf Rake

Buyplus Adjustable Garden Leaf Rake - 24 to 63 Inch Telescopic Metal Rake, Expandable Folding Leaves Rake for Lawn Yard, Flowers Beds and Roof

With the steel Buyplus Adjustable Garden Leaf Rake, rust won’t corrode your love for the garden tool. Why? Because the zinc-plated steel teeth and steel handle help prevent this leaf rake from rusting.  

Shrink down the metal rake’s adjustable head to 8 inches for light-duty raking in the flower beds, or expand it 23 inches for gathering leaves in the lawn. The telescopic rake expands from 40 to 63 inches, making it slightly more difficult to store than the ORIENTOOLS and MLTOOLS Leaf Rakes. 

Specifications: 

  • Tine Material: Steel
  • Handle Material: Steel
  • Number of Tines: 15
  • Rake Head Width: 23 inches

Pros: 

✓ Zinc-plated steel handle and rake head help prevent rust
✓ Steel tines
✓ Steel handle
✓ Lightweight

Cons: 

✗ Some users report their rake would not telescope or adjust
✗ The most expensive telescopic rake on our list

Buyers Guide

Before you make that impulse buy, take a moment to consider if the leaf rake meets your needs. Tackling a pile of wet leaves? Then you might want a heavy-duty rake. Do you experience frequent back pain when handling tools? Then consider a lightweight rake. 

Our buying guide below offers helpful tips on identifying a quality leaf rake for you and your yard. The leaves won’t rake themselves, but neither will a rake that snaps in two! 

Pro Tips: If you have a load of leaves and a bit of cash to spare, you might find that a leaf blower gets the job done much faster than even the best leaf rakes. And if you want a rake that loosens soil and spreads mulch, you might need a bow rake instead of a leaf rake. 

Telescopic vs. Non-Telescopic

Telescoping handles, like the MLTOOLS Leaf Rake, have several adjustable segments that slide in or out of one another to either increase or decrease the handle’s length. 

Non-telescopic rakes, such as the Fiskars PRO Rake, have a straight shaft that cannot be adjusted. 

Both handle types have their pros and cons, but each serves a distinct purpose: Telescopic handles are best for light-duty work, and non-telescopic handles are best for heavy-duty work. 

Telescopic 

Pros: 

✓ Telescopic leaf rakes are easy to store–– you can shrink them down to fit snug in a small space. 

✓ They make it easy to accommodate various user heights if you have multiple family members helping in the yard. Some users prefer a long handle, while others adjust the rake down to a short handle.

✓ Adjusting the handle allows the user to reach tight spaces.   

✓ Telescopic leaf rakes often come with an adjustable rake head. The user can shrink the tines closer together to act as a shrub rake or fan out the rake head for a broader stroke. 

✓ Telescopic rakes are often lightweight, making yard work easier for users who experience muscle fatigue. 

✓ Telescopic rakes are often an affordable choice for buyers on a budget. 

Cons: 

✗ Although telescopic leaf rakes are often metal (a superior handle material), their handles are typically not as strong as non-telescopic handles. Why? Because telescopic rake handles are thin, hollow, and have more weak points along the shaft than non-telescopic handles. 

✗ Because telescopic rakes aren’t as tough and durable as non-telescopic rakes, they usually have a shorter tool lifespan. Replacing broken telescopic rakes might cost you more in the long run compared to a one-time purchase of a heavy-duty non-telescopic rake. 

✗ Compared to non-telescopic rakes, a telescopic rake’s tines are typically farther apart. The extra space between tines makes it difficult to gather large amounts of leaves –– especially if the leaves are small, as they’ll slip right through the tines. 

Non-Telescopic

Pros: 

✓ Non-telescopic rakes are often stronger than telescopic rakes and better suited for heavy-duty work. 

✓ As long as the materials are high-quality, a non-telescopic rake typically has a longer tool lifespan than a telescopic rake. 

✓ Non-telescopic rakes typically have more teeth than a telescopic rake, making it easier to gather leaves. 

✓ Non-telescopic handles have more material options than telescopic handles. Telescopic handles are usually metal, while non-telescopic handles can be wood, fiberglass, or metal.  

Cons: 

✗ Non-telescopic rakes can be expensive
✗ Non-telescopic rakes typically don’t come with an adjustable rake head
✗ Storage can be more difficult with a non-telescopic rake
✗ Non-telescopic rakes might be too heavy for some users

Handle Materials

A rake’s materials significantly determine its quality. The four most common rake handle materials are wood, fiberglass, aluminum, and steel. Let’s take a look at how they differ in quality. 

Wood

Pros: 

✓ Durable
✓ Looks beautiful
✓ Traditional tool handle material
✓ Absorbs shock
✓ Easy to replace

Cons: 

✗ Susceptible to rot and water damage. Must be well maintained and stored in a dry place. 
✗ Although a durable material, it’s more likely to snap in two than fiberglass, aluminum, or steel. 

Pro Tip: Ash and hickory are the best woods for tool handles. Handles with unspecified wood might be weak and prone to splintering. 

Fiberglass

Pros: 

✓ Lightweight
✓ Stronger than wood
✓ Not susceptible to water damage
✓ Doesn’t rust
✓ Absorbs shock

Cons: 

✗ Not as strong as metal handles
✗ Difficult to replace

Aluminum

Pros: 

✓ Lighter and stronger than fiberglass
✓ Rust-resistant

Cons: 

✗ Not as durable as steel
✗ Doesn’t absorb shock

Steel

Pros: 

✓ Strongest handle material. 
✓ Stainless steel is rust-resistant. 

Cons: 

✗ Doesn’t absorb shock
✗ Is the heaviest handle material
✗ Carbon steel is not rust-resistant. 

Tine Materials

A rake head’s tines, also known as teeth, are typically made of plastic, resin, or steel. A quality leaf rake should have strong tines; otherwise, they’ll easily bend and snap. 

  • Plastic heads have the weakest teeth but are often the most affordable. 
  • Resin is a good alternative to plastic. It’s stronger than plastic but not as strong as metal. 
  • Steel tines are the strongest tines and ideal for heavy-duty work. 

Rake Head Width

Most rake heads are between 23 and 25 inches wide. The wider the rake head, the more area you can cover and the faster you’ll complete the job. A narrow rake head will require more raking and increase user fatigue. 

Weight

Heavy-duty rakes might cause your arms and back to ache. Spend a few dollars extra, and you can have a rake that’s both lightweight and tough. 

Increasing your budget might not sound ideal, but after your muscles start to scream from carrying a heavy rake, you’ll wish you had spent more green for fewer pounds. 

Grip

Keep your eyes open for leaf rakes with ergonomic, non-slip grips. A gripped handle enhances user comfort and minimizes wrist strain. The less pain you feel while raking the leaves, the more productive you’ll be. 

FAQs About Leaf Rakes

1. What’s the difference between a garden rake and a leaf rake?

A garden rake and leaf rake both have tines that collect debris, but the tools are more like cousins than twins. 

A leaf rake’s tines are long, thin, springing, and gentle on the grass. Its head fans out into a triangle to collect large amounts of leaves. A leaf rake is usually plastic, resin, or metal. 

A garden rake’s tines are short, thick, and attached to a horizontal head. Garden rakes aren’t ideal for raking leaves because their metal tines will tear up the turf. Also known as a bow rake, the garden rake helps spread (and level) mulch and gravel and loosens garden soil. 

2. What are the different types of rakes?

Bow and leaf rakes aren’t the only rakes you might want to add to your toolshed. Need to rake up thatch or rake snow off the roof? You’ll need a rake for that. 

Rake types include: 

— Shrub rake
— Thatch rake
— Hand rake
— Leaf scoop rake
— Lake rake
— Roof rake
— Power rake

3. How do I collect leaves in my yard –– fast?

Collecting leaves can be time-consuming work, but with the right tricks up your sleeve, you can get it done in a jiffy. One great tip is to rake your leaves on a large tarp which you can then drag to the compost pile or other areas of the yard. 

Another way to save time is to invest in a leaf blower or leaf vacuum. These tools use gusts of air to move and collect leaves. They might be more expensive than a leaf rake, but they can be a champion when you need to clear up the lawn in minutes. 

Like the tarp idea? Check out how it’s done in this video by This Old House:

 

When to Call a Professional

Raking leaves is a tiresome weekend chore, but the right leaf rake can ease the burden. 

Don’t enjoy bagging your leaves? Neither do we! Here are seven things to do with leaves that we think you’ll prefer much more than throwing them in a landfill. 

Better yet, why not hire a local lawn care professional to gather the leaves for you? After all, raking leaves is tough on the back and steals away time from friends and family. If you’re on the fence about hiring a pro to rake the leaves, here’s what you can expect

Main Photo Credit: utroja0 / Pixabay

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Jane Purnell

Jane Purnell

Jane Purnell is a freelance writer and actor in New York City. She earned her B.A. from the University of Virginia and enjoys a warm cup of French press coffee.